Home » VENTURES IN COMMON SENSE (The Free-Lance Books Series) by Edgar Watson Howe
VENTURES IN COMMON SENSE (The Free-Lance Books Series) Edgar Watson Howe

VENTURES IN COMMON SENSE (The Free-Lance Books Series)

Edgar Watson Howe

Published November 24th 2010
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
276 pages
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 About the Book 

Contents:Introduction by H. L. MenckenI. WomenII. PoliticsIII. ReligionIV. ManV. The PoorVI. BusinessVII. LiteratureVIII. PhilosophyIX. NewspapersX. ProfessorsXI. The PeopleXII. FoolsXIII. IndustryXIV. LibertyXV. SentimentXVI. ConductXVII. WarXVIII.MoreContents:Introduction by H. L. MenckenI. WomenII. PoliticsIII. ReligionIV. ManV. The PoorVI. BusinessVII. LiteratureVIII. PhilosophyIX. NewspapersX. ProfessorsXI. The PeopleXII. FoolsXIII. IndustryXIV. LibertyXV. SentimentXVI. ConductXVII. WarXVIII. Old AgeXIX. FameXX. CriticsXXI. ThriftXXII. GreatnessXXIII. MaterialismXXIV. FriendshipXXV. RevolutionXXVI. SociologyXXVII. ChildrenXVIII. ProvincialismXXIX. RumourXXX. SelfishnessXXXI. AdvertisingXXXII. The Miscellany Of LifeINTRODUCTIONThis collection of aphorisms and arguments is made up chiefly of extracts from E. W. Howes Monthly, perhaps the most curious as it is certainly one of the most entertaining of all the 25,000 periodicals now issuing in the United States. Retiring, in 1911, from the management of the Atchison (Kansas) Globe, a newspaper which, in a quarter of a century, he had brought up from the utmost obscurity to great influence and prosperity, Howe established his Monthly in order to soothe an old journalists incurable itch to have his say. Here, even more than when he edited his daily, he had an organ all his own, and here, once he got into his stride, he began to unfold a body of ideas that gradually won him a national audience. He had been, of course, by no means unheard of before. Far back in the 80s he had written a novel that won the praise of W. D. Howells, and in the Globe, as I have said, he had wielded a good deal of power in the Middle West. But in his Monthly, for the first time, he could throw off the taboos and hesitations that lie upon even the most independent of daily papers, and the results of this new freedom were quickly visible. Strangers very far from Kansas and its woes began to hear of Howe and to send in their subscriptions, and before long the Monthly began to be read in all parts of the country and Howe found himself a man of nation-wide reputation. I doubt that there is another periodical in America which shows so remarkable a subscription list to-day. The professorial mind, perhaps, soars above it, but among men of practical affairs as opposed to men of mere theories—that is, among bankers, manufacturers and the heads of big trading organizations—it has a truly amazing circulation. Oddly enough, it is also very extensively read by authors and editors, especially the latter. I scarcely know of the editor of a big daily, indeed, who doesnt glance at it now and then, and the same thing is true of the editors of the principal magazines. What primarily attracts the business men, of course, is Howes persistent and often very adroit defense of their much maligned order, but what interests the editors is the extraordinary charm of his naive and confidential manner, his quite exceptional capacity for putting the plain thoughts of a plain man into such English that the professional eye immediately discerns its skillfulness and delights in its disarming persuasiveness.